ANNOUNCEMENTS

SAVE THE DATE!

2018 Alabama Rural Health Conference

Friday, April 20 and Saturday, April 21, 2018

Prattville Marriott Hotel & Conference Center

Alabama Rural Health Talking Points - 2017

Life expectancy at birth for rural Alabamians is one-half of a year lower than that for urban Alabama residents and 3 ½ years lower than that for the nation.  Life expectancy for residents of Wilcox County is 9 years lower than that for the nation.

 

More than one in every five rural residents is eligible for Medicaid.

 

Nearly one half (47%) of all rural children are eligible for Medicaid.

 

14 rural counties have between 10 and 16 percent of all households with no vehicle.

 

Only two of Alabama’s 54 rural counties (Coffee and Pike) are not entirely or partially classified as primary care shortage areas.  There are 4.1 primary care physicians per 10,000 population in Alabama’s rural counties compared to 7.9 for urban residents.

 

All of Alabama’s 54 rural counties are classified as dental shortage areas for the delivery of service to the low-income population.  Only Shelby County and a portion of Madison County are not currently classified as dental care shortage areas.  There are 2.7 dentists per 10,000 population in Alabama’s rural counties compared to 5.5 for urban residents.

 

Alabama currently has three counties (Coosa, Greene, and Lowndes) with no full-time dentists in the entire county.  Coosa does not have a physician in the entire county.

 

All of Alabama’s 54 rural counties are classified as mental health care shortage areas for providing mental health care to the entire or low-income populations.  Only Madison County is not currently classified as mental health care shortage areas. 

 

In 1980, 45 of Alabama’s 54 rural counties had hospitals providing obstetrical service.  Today only 16 of the 54 counties offer this basic service.  In 1980, 10 of the 12 Black Belt Region counties had hospitals providing obstetrical service.  Today only one still offers this service.

 

More than ¼ of all births to rural Alabama women involve mothers who received less than adequate prenatal care during their pregnancy.

 

13 rural Alabama counties do not have a dialysis clinic.

 

7 rural counties (Cleburne, Coosa, Henry, Lamar, Lowndes, Macon, and Perry) do not have a hospital.

 

Having healthy population growth is a basic requirement for attracting and keeping adequate health care services.  Between 1910 and 2010, 24 of Alabama’s 54 rural counties actually lost population.  39 of the 54 rural counties and 2 of the 13 urban counties are projected to lose population between 2010 and 2040.

 

Obesity is a major risk factor for numerous serious health conditions.  There are 10 rural Alabama counties with between 40 and 49% of the adult population being obese.

 

The mortality rate for rural Alabama residents is over 10% higher than that for urban residents.

 

The chronic lower respiratory diseases mortality rate for rural Alabama residents is nearly 38% higher than that for urban residents and nearly 57% higher than that for the nation.

 

The motor vehicle accident mortality rate for rural Alabama residents is nearly 67% higher than that for urban residents and more than 120% higher than the national rate.

ARHA Announces Drive to Establish Student Chapters

                             Funding For New Student Chapter Available

 

Your Alabama Rural Health Association has received funding that will be used to establish new chapters of the Alabama Student Rural Health Association on campuses of Alabama's public and private colleges, universities, and community colleges.  

 

Student membership in ASRHA is a bargain at a cost of only $15 per school year.  Included in this membership is annual membership in the campus ASRHA chapter (on campuses with ASRHA chapters), a full annual membership in the Alabama Rural Health Association, and a school year student membership in the National Rural Health Association.  For additional information on student memberships and benefits, select "Join ARHA".

 

Student members can also seek election as an officer in their campus chapter or seek election to the student position on the ARHA Board of Directors.

 

Campus ASRHA chapters will have regular meetings during which information of value to students pursuing health related careers will be provided.  A listing of possible program topics and speakers is currently being developed.  Chapters will also conduct health related community projects.  Each campus chapter must have a faculty/staff sponsor to oversee the chapter activities.  

 

To assist in establishing campus chapters of ASRHA, the following are being sought:

     Students with an interest in helping to establish a chapter at their school.

     Faculty/staff at Alabama schools interested in serving as a campus sponsor.

     Potential speakers on topics of interest to health related program students.

 

Please contact ARHA to assist with this program or if you have questions or recommendations.